NFL Pro Bowl rosters: Chiefs’ Patrick Mahomes, Packers’ Aaron Rodgers starting QBs

The Kansas City Chiefs, Green Bay Packers, Baltimore Ravens and Seattle Seahawks each had seven players selected to the 2021 Pro Bowl teams on Monday.

The Dallas Cowboys were among the teams without a Pro Bowl player. This is only the third time in their history Dallas didn’t have at least one Pro Bowl representative.

The Pro Bowl game was canceled, the NFL announced in October, due to COVID-19. Pro Bowl week will instead feature Madden matchups between current players, former players, celebrities and EA Sports Madden NFL 21 video game streamers using the Pro Bowl rosters. Players will also participate in a Madden Pro Bowl.

It will be the first time since the 1949 season the NFL has failed to hold a postseason all-star game.

AFC EAST

Buffalo Bills

Pro Bowlers: Stefon Diggs, WR (1), Josh Allen, QB (1), Tremaine Edmunds, LB (2), Andre Roberts, RS (3), Tre’Davious White, CB (2)

In his first season in Buffalo, Diggs set a franchise single-season record for catches (111) and is 55 yards (he has 1,314) away from setting another in receiving yards. Allen is in a three-horse race for Most Valuable Player and could come away with the league’s Most Improved Player award as he churns toward breaking nearly every single-season passing record in Bills history. After a slow start to the season, Edmunds has found his Pro Bowl-caliber play from last season, while White and Roberts picked up right where they left off from their Pro Bowl seasons in 2019.

Did you know? The Bills have made four picks in the first round of the NFL draft since the start of the Sean McDermott/Brandon Beane era in 2017. Three of them, White, Allen and Edmunds, have been selected to at least one Pro Bowl. The team traded its first-round pick in 2020 for Diggs, who also made the Pro Bowl this year. — Marcel Louis-Jacques

Miami Dolphins

Pro Bowlers: Xavien Howard, CB, (2)

Over the past three years, Howard is the only player that has represented the Miami Dolphins in the Pro Bowl. And now he’s done it twice, both times as a starter (2018 and 2020). Howard, the NFL’s interception leader (9), was an easy selection to be an AFC starter as he’s been the conference’s best cornerback throughout the season. It’s been more than just interceptions for Howard, who ranks in the top-3 in QB passer rating and completion percentage when targeted. There were other worthy Dolphins candidates such as DE Emmanuel Ogbah and K Jason Sanders, but they were facing stiff positional competition. Howard has clearly been the best player on the No.2 scoring defense, and he may have All-Pro and even Defensive Player of the Year honors ahead for him.

Did you know? Howard is the fourth cornerback in Dolphins history to earn multiple Pro Bowl selections and third to be chosen as a starter, joining Sam Madison (1999-2002), Pat Surtain (2002-04) and Brent Grimes (2013-15). — Cameron Wolfe

New England Patriots

Pro Bowlers: Matthew Slater, ST (9), Stephon Gilmore, CB (4), Jake Bailey, P (1)

Slater extends his own record for Pro Bowl berths by a special teamer. He remains one of the NFL’s top coverage players on punts as evidenced by a play he made at the goal line in Sunday’s loss to the Dolphins. He easily could have shared the berth with teammate Justin Bethel, who entered Week 15 leading the team with 11 special teams tackles. As for Bailey, he’s arguably been the team MVP. Entering Week 15, he was fourth in the NFL in average (48.8) and first in net (46.1). Of his 40 punts, he has three touchbacks and 23 downed inside the 20.

Did you know? The last time the Patriots had a punter named a Pro Bowler was Rich Camarillo in 1983. — Mike Reiss

New York Jets

Pro Bowlers: None

DT Quinnen Williams (seven sacks) was the Jets’ most deserving candidate, but it’s tough to get recognition on a 1-13 team. This also was his first Pro Bowl-caliber season, and players often need to put one in the bank before they’re rewarded with a payout. Rookie LT Mekhi Becton won the fan voting for tackles in the AFC, but he, too, fell short. He made a lot of splash plays as a blocker, but he still must improve on a down-to-down basis before he can crack the league’s elite. Both Becton and Williams should have multiple Pro Bowls in their future.

Did you know? The Jets have gone five consecutive years without an offensive skill player in the Pro Bowl. The last two were WR Brandon Marshall and RB Chris Ivory in 2015. The last skill player drafted by the Jets to make the Pro Bowl was WR Keyshawn Johnson, who was picked way, way back in 1996. — Rich Cimini

AFC NORTH

Baltimore Ravens

Pro Bowlers: Orlando Brown Jr., OT (2), Calais Campbell, DE (6), Morgan Cox, LS (4), Marlon Humphrey, CB (2), Matthew Judon, OLB (2), FB Patrick Ricard, FB (2), Justin Tucker, K (4)

The Ravens had seven players selected to the Pro Bowl, which is down from the NFL record-typing 13 from a year ago. Humphrey is a Defensive Player of the Year candidate with eight forced fumbles, the second-most in an NFL single season by a defensive back. Judon is one of three NFL outside linebackers to produce at least 40 tackles (41), five sacks (five) and 20 quarterback hits (20) in 2020. “Honestly, I didn’t have the numbers or production like last year when I went to my first Pro Bowl, so the amount of excitement, surprise and happiness that rushed in when I got the news – I was just elated and really happy,” Judon said. “I could have done jumping jacks all around the house.” Campbell is a surprise after being limited to 10 games, but his six passes defensed tie (Montez Sweat) for the NFL’s second most by a defensive end. On offense, Brown and Ricard are integral members of the NFL’s top-ranked rushing attack. Headlining the Ravens special teams was Tucker, the most accurate kicker in NFL history (90.6%) who is 23-of-26 on field goal attempts in 2020, with two of his misses coming from 57 and 61 yards.

Did you know? Lamar Jackson becomes the sixth quarterback in the past two decades to win his first NFL MVP and not reach the Pro Bowl the following season. Jackson ranked 11th in Total QBR (71.5) and 22nd in passing yards (246.1). The others: Rich Gannon, Steve McNair, Tom Brady (who was injured), Cam Newton and Matt Ryan. — Jamison Hensley

Cincinnati Bengals

Pro Bowlers: None

Bengals safety Jessie Bates had a strong case to make the Pro Bowl. The 2018 second-round pick has been one of the best safeties in the NFL this season. Coming into Monday’s game against Pittsburgh, Bates led all safeties in passes defensed (14) and expected points added when targeted (-10.9), according to NFL Next Gen Stats. But that kind of snub happens when someone is playing for a team that has four combined wins over the past two seasons. Wide receiver Tyler Boyd also had his case severely dented when rookie quarterback Joe Burrow was knocked out for the season with a knee injury.

Did you know? This is the first time since 2010 that the Bengals haven’t had a Pro Bowl representative. To make matters worse, Tyler Eifert remains the most recent Bengals draft pick to be named to the Pro Bowl. Eifert was drafted in 2013, and plays for the Jacksonville Jaguars. — Ben Baby

Cleveland Browns

Pro Bowlers: Nick Chubb, RB (2), Joel Bitonio, OG (3), Myles Garrett, DE (2)

Despite missing four games with a knee injury, Chubb was selected to the Pro Bowl for a second consecutive year. Bitonio, anchoring arguably the most improved offensive line in the NFL, has made it for a third consecutive season. And Garrett, whose 2019 season was cut short due to a six-game suspension for the infamous helmet swing, was selected for a second time in three years. All three have spearheaded Cleveland’s push to a playoff berth for the first time in 18 years, and clearly are deserving of this recognition.

Did you know? Bitonio is the first Browns guard to be selected to three consecutive Pro Bowls since Pro Football Hall of Famer Gene Hickerson made six in a row from 1966-71. — Jake Trotter

Pittsburgh Steelers

Pro Bowlers: David DeCastro, G (6), Maurkice Pouncey, C (9), Cam Heyward, DT (3), TJ Watt, OLB (2), Minkah Fitzpatrick, S (2)

For the second year in a row, the Steelers didn’t have a single offensive skill player selected to the Pro Bowl. And given the inconsistency of the offense, that isn’t a huge surprise. Even without an offensive skill player, the Steelers still had five selections, making it five Pro Bowls in a row the team has had five or more players named to the roster. The offensive selections, Pouncey and DeCastro, represent the mainstays of a usually stout offensive line. Defensively, Watt leads the way as a Defensive Player of the Year candidate with 12 sacks, one forced fumble and a career-high 19 tackles for loss.

Did you know? The same five Steelers selected to the 2021 Pro Bowl are the five who were selected as starters a year ago. — Brooke Pryor

AFC SOUTH

Houston Texans

Pro Bowlers: Deshaun Watson, QB (3), Laremy Tunsil, LT (2)

Through 14 games, Watson leads the NFL in passing yards per attempt (8.76) and ranks second with 4,134 passing yards and a passer rating of 110.6. On Sunday against the Colts, Watson set a single-season career high with his 27th passing touchdown of the season. Tunsil was selected for the second consecutive season, becoming only the second offensive lineman in franchise history to be named to the Pro Bowl in consecutive seasons. The Texans signed both players to contract extensions during the offseason. Inside linebacker Zach Cunningham, who leads the NFL in tackles, did not make the team.

Did you know? Watson became the first quarterback in franchise history to record three Pro Bowl selections. — Sarah Barshop

Indianapolis Colts

Pro Bowlers: Darius Leonard, LB (2), Ryan Kelly C (2), Quenton Nelson G (3)

It’s no surprise that Leonard, Kelly and Nelson were selected. It’s more about who did not make it for the Colts. One of the biggest names missing from the list is defensive lineman DeForest Buckner, the prized offseason pickup by the Colts. He’s second in the league among interior defensive linemen in sacks (7.5), quarterback hits (24) and total tackles (52). None of those stats were good enough to make the Pro Bowl.

Did you know? Nelson is just the third Colt — Andrew Luck and Alan Ameche — in team history to be selected to the Pro Bowl in each of their first three seasons. Nelson is also the first offensive lineman to do it in the NFL since Zack Martin did it between 2014-17. — Mike Wells

Jacksonville Jaguars

Pro Bowlers: None

Running back James Robinson, who leads all rookies in rushing and is third in the NFL, and linebacker Myles Jack deserved consideration. Robinson has 1,070 yards rushing and is close to breaking the record for most rushing yards by an undrafted rookie (1,104 yards) and has a shot at breaking Fred Taylor’s rookie rushing record (1,228 yards). Jack has thrived since moving back to weakside linebacker this season and at one point was Pro Football Focus’ highest-rated outside linebacker. He’s two tackles shy of his career high (105) and has two fumble recoveries, a forced fumble, and an interception. However, there’s no secret to why Robinson and Jack didn’t make the Pro Bowl: When your team is 1-13 and has lost 13 consecutive games, you’re not going to get much recognition.

Did you know? The Jaguars have had two players earn Pro Bowl MVP: Quarterback Mark Brunell in 1997 and defensive end Calais Campbell in 2019. — Mike DiRocco

Tennessee Titans

Pro Bowlers: Derrick Henry, RB (2), A.J. Brown, WR (1)

Henry has been the NFL’s most consistent running back this season. Every week opposing defenses know Henry is going to get the football but they are still not able to stop him. His blend of size, speed, power and explosiveness has led to countless highlights reel moments this season. Brown has 56 catches for 881 yards and 10 touchdowns despite missing three games early in the season because of knee injury.

Did you know? Henry is the first running back to post consecutive seasons with at least 1,500 rushing yards since Larry Johnson and Tiki Barber did so in 2005 and 2006.— Turron Davenport

AFC WEST

Denver Broncos

Pro Bowlers: Justin Simmons, S (1), Bradley Chubb, LB (1)

Simmons deserved to be selected in 2019 and had the odd honor of being a second-team All-Pro selection and not even being a Pro Bowl alternate. He has played every snap in each of the past three seasons. In a season when the Broncos have lost five cornerbacks to injury or suspension, he has been a big part of the team’s success in the red zone and on third down. He also has been one of the best run defenders at his position in the league. For Chubb, he returned from last season’s torn ACL to lead the Broncos in sacks, quarterback hits and tackles for loss despite Von Miller having not played a snap after an ankle injury days before the season opener. As far as snubs, left tackle Garett Bolles signed a lucrative contract extension but was not selected.

Did you know? This is the third time in the past six years the Broncos have had an edge rusher and a safety named to the Pro Bowl in the same season. Miller and Darian Stewart were among the Broncos selected in the 2016 season while Miller and T.J. Ward were among the Broncos named in the 2015 season. — Jeff Legwold

Kansas City Chiefs

Pro Bowlers: Frank Clark, DE (2), Eric Fisher, OT (2), Tyreek Hill, WR (5), Chris Jones, DT (2), Travis Kelce, TE (6), Patrick Mahomes, QB (3), Tyrann Mathieu, DB (2)

The defending Super Bowl champions, who have the best record in the league (13-1), tied the Packers, Ravens and Seahawks for the most players selected. Mahomes, chasing his second MVP award in three years, leads the league in passing yards (4,462). Kelce and Hill are chasing the best seasons of their careers, with Kelce trying to become the first tight end in NFL history to lead the league in receiving yards. He’s currently six (1,318) behind the leader, DeAndre Hopkins (1,324) of the Arizona Cardinals. Hill has 15 receiving touchdowns, and has made the Pro Bowl in each of his five NFL seasons. Six of the seven Chiefs selections were designated as starters for the Pro Bowl, even though the game won’t be played. Clark is the exception.

Did you know? The Chiefs had a quarterback selected for a franchise-record fifth consecutive season. This counts three seasons for Mahomes, plus 2016 and 2017 for Alex Smith. — Adam Teicher

Las Vegas Raiders

Pro Bowlers: Darren Waller, TE (1), Josh Jacobs, RB (1)

It is no surprise that the two Pro Bowl selections for the Raiders, who are 7-7 after a 6-3 start, are on the offensive side of the ball (yeah, the defense is that bad). Though center Rodney Hudson not getting a bid is, well, strange. Waller has hit his stride of late with a combined 29 catches for 425 yards (the most receiving yards by a tight end in a three-game span in NFL history) and three TDs in the Raiders’ past three games. In all, his 93 catches, 967 receiving yards and 504 yards after the catch rank second in the NFL among tight ends with his eight receiving TDs third. Jacobs, meanwhile, ranks third in rushes (245), sixth in rushing yards (907) and is tied for sixth in rushing TDs (10), despite missing a game with a sprained right ankle. He has six career multi-rushing TD games, with only Hall of Famer Eric Dickerson and Ezekiel Elliott having more such games, with seven each, through a player’s first 22 career games.

Did you know? Jacobs is only the third Raiders running back to be selected to the Pro Bowl since his mentor and Hall of Famer Marcus Allen in 1987. Bo Jackson was picked in 1990 and Latavius Murray in 2015. — Paul Gutierrez

Los Angeles Chargers

Pro Bowlers: Keenan Allen, WR (4), Joey Bosa, DE (3)

Allen has caught 100 passes, his third 100-reception season in his career, for 992 yards and a career-high eight touchdowns this season. He set the all-time record with 624 receptions through the first 100 games of his career. Allen is also tied for the fewest games (96) to reach 600 receptions in NFL history and posted two games of 13 or more receptions this season, 16 in Week 11 against the Jets and 13 in Week 3 against the Panthers. Bosa entered this week with 27 quarterback hits and 15 tackles for loss, ranking second in the AFC in each category despite missing two games to injury. 2020 marks the third season of Bosa’s five-year career with at least 15 tackles for loss. Bosa’s best game came in Week 12 against the Bills, setting single-game career highs with nine tackles (eight solo), three sacks, six tackles for loss, five quarterback hits, a fumble recovery and a pass defended.

Did you know? There were those who thought that Justin Herbert would become the first Chargers rookie quarterback to make the Pro Bowl, as he is tied with Baker Mayfield for the NFL rookie record for TD passes with 27. He fell short, though, making Philip Rivers (2006) the only Chargers QB to make the Pro Bowl in his first full season as a starter. — Shelley Smith

NFC EAST

Dallas Cowboys

Pro Bowlers: None

It is only the third time in franchise history the Cowboys have not had at least one player selected to the Pro Bowl. The others came in 1986, when the Cowboys’ mark of 20 consecutive winning seasons came to an end, and 1989, Jerry Jones’ first year as owner and general manager when they finished 1-15. Blame this year on a poor record and injuries. Left tackle Tyron Smith had made the Pro Bowl every year since 2013. Right guard Zack Martin had made it every year since 2014. Smith played two games this season because of a neck injury; Martin was having one of his better seasons before suffering a calf injury on Thanksgiving. Running back Ezekiel Elliott made it every time he has played a full season, but he has lost five fumbles and might not reach 1,000 yards this season.

Did you know? From 2010-19, the Cowboys had 24 players earn Pro Bowl selections, despite making the playoffs four times and not advancing past the divisional round. Only the Baltimore Ravens (29) and Kansas City Chiefs (25) had more selections during that span, according to Elias. — Todd Archer

New York Giants

Pro Bowlers: James Bradberry, CB (1), Evan Engram, TE (1)

Bradberry signed a lucrative free-agent deal with the Giants this offseason. He has possibly exceeded expectations, ranking second in the NFL with 17 passes defensed. “It’s a surreal feeling,” Bradberry said. Engram was more of a surprise selection. He’s had an up-and-down season that includes 54 receptions for 572 yards and two touchdowns. He’s also tied for first among all tight ends with six drops, but has shown flashes of being an improved blocker. Strong cases can be made that defensive lineman Leonard Williams (8.5 sacks), middle linebacker Blake Martinez (128 tackles, T-4th) and free safety Logan Ryan (3 forced fumbles) were more deserving.

Did you know? Engram is the first Giants tight end to reach the Pro Bowl since Jeremy Shockey in 2006.— Jordan Raanan

Philadelphia Eagles

Pro Bowlers: Brandon Graham, DE (1), Jason Kelce, C (4), Fletcher Cox, DT (6)

Graham, the longest-tenured member of the Eagles defense, finally broke through and received his first Pro Bowl bid thanks to a red-hot start to the season in which he racked up seven sacks over the first eight games. Graham, 32, was not shy about his desire to add this accomplishment to a resume that includes Super Bowl LII hero. Kelce, 33, remains one of the best centers in the game. A three-time first-team All-Pro, four-time Pro Bowler and Super Bowl champion, he is steadily putting together a career worthy of Hall of Fame consideration.

Did you know? Kelce owns the most Pro Bowl nods by any center in franchise history and the second-most by any offensive lineman in franchise history behind only Jason Peters (seven). — Tim McManus

Washington Football Team

Pro Bowlers: Brandon Scherff, RG (4), Chase Young, DE (1)

Scherff, who was picked as a starter, has been a steady force, excellent in pass protection and run blocking. Young, selected as a backup, has 5.5 sacks and a touchdown. The rookie has been terrific at stopping the run and breaking up multiple plays simply by his awareness. End Montez Sweat, tackle Jonathan Allen and even tackle Daron Payne warranted consideration. Punter Tress Way easily could have repeated his 2019 honor; his 44.66 net punting average ranks third in the NFL. Receiver Terry McLaurin will make it whenever Washington receives consistent quarterback play. He has 1,078 yards receiving, but three touchdowns.

Did you know? Young becomes only the fifth Washington rookie — and second on defense — to make the Pro Bowl since the NFL-AFL merger in 1970. The last rookie to make the team was quarterback Robert Griffin III in 2012. The only other defensive player to make it in this time was linebacker Brian Orakpo in 2009.— John Keim

NFC NORTH

Chicago Bears

Pro Bowlers: Khalil Mack, OLB (6), Cordarrelle Patterson, KR (4)

Mack is widely regarded as one of the game’s top pass rushers, and leads Chicago with eight sacks and 49 quarterback hurries, tied for second in the league with Tampa’s Shaquil Barrett. Mack’s three forced fumbles are tied for fourth best in the NFC. Patterson has been one of the best kickoff returners since he entered the league, and tops all kickoff returners in both average (29.4) and yards (942). An argument can be made that LB Roquan Smith (team-high 128 tackles and 17 tackles for loss) also deserved to make the roster.

Did you know? Mack and Patterson are Chicago’s 13th and 14th Pro Bowl selections since the beginning of the 2018 season under head coach Matt Nagy. The Bears once went five straight seasons (1995-99) without a single player being named to the Pro Bowl. — Jeff Dickerson

Detroit Lions

Pro Bowlers: T.J. Hockenson, TE (1), Jack Fox, P (1), Frank Ragnow, C (1)

Hockenson has thrived in his second season with 60 catches for 675 yards and six touchdowns, becoming one of Matthew Stafford’s most reliable targets and a consistent piece to a Detroit offense that has been without Kenny Golladay for most of the season. Ragnow continues his ascent as one of the best offensive lineman in the game — he would have had a case for a Pro Bowl spot a season ago, too — and might be the NFC’s best center. Fox, in his first season in the league, is averaging 49.27 yards per punt (third in the NFL) and second in the league in net yards per punt (45.27). He has 21 punts inside the 20-yard line.

Did you know? It’s the third time in five seasons the Lions have had a special teams representative at the Pro Bowl. Kicker Matt Prater was selected in 2016 and long-snapper Don Muhlbach made it in 2018.— Michael Rothstein

Green Bay Packers

Pro Bowlers: Aaron Rodgers, QB (9); Davante Adams, WR (4); David Bakhtiari, T (3); Elgton Jenkins, G (1); Za’Darius Smith, OLB (2); Jaire Alexander, CB (1); Aaron Jones, RB (1)

Everyone but Jones was selected as a starter. Rodgers was selected for the ninth time, tying him with Forest Gregg and Brett Favre for the most in team history. Adams is the first Packers receiver to make four consecutive Pro Bowls since James Lofton made six in a row (1980-85). Jenkins and Alexander are the first of GM Brian Gutekunst’s draft picks to be selected. Perhaps the biggest snub was kicker Mason Crosby, who has not missed a field goal this season.

Did you know? This is the most original selections to the Pro Bowl for the Packers since they also had seven in 2011. — Rob Demovsky

Minnesota Vikings

Pro Bowlers: Dalvin Cook, RB (2); Justin Jefferson, WR (1)

Cook’s second consecutive Pro Bowl comes after leading fan voting as the top NFC running back. The 25-year-old was named the NFC’s Offensive Player of the Month for November and notched his eighth 100-yard rushing game of the season in Week 15, tying Robert Smith with the third-most 100-yard rushing games in a season in franchise history. Cook leads the NFL in yards from scrimmage (1,833) and is tied with Tennessee’s Derrick Henry with 15 rushing touchdowns. Jefferson is one of three Vikings wide receivers to be named to the Pro Bowl as a rookie, joining Randy Moss and Sammy White one day after setting a franchise rookie record for catches (73). Jefferson became the fifth player in NFL history to record six 100-yard receiving games as a rookie and leads all first-year receivers with 1,182 yards.

Did you know? This is the first season since 2014 the Vikings have failed to have a defensive player make the Pro Bowl.— Courtney Cronin

NFC SOUTH

Atlanta Falcons

Pro Bowlers: Grady Jarrett, DT (2); Younghoe Koo, K (1)

Jarrett is one of the most dominant interior defensive linemen in the league with four sacks, seven tackles for loss, 48 tackles, a fumble recovery and 48 quarterback hits. He has 25 combined pressures and has been a bright spot on a struggling team. Younghoe Koo rebounded from his early career struggles with the Chargers to become one of the league’s most dynamic kickers by making 35-of-36 field goals, including all eight from 50 yards or further. Calvin Ridley could have been a consideration with a 77-catch, 1,192-yard, nine-touchdown season.

Did you know? This is the first time Julio Jones hasn’t made the Pro Bowl since 2013 and the first time a Falcons running back, tight end or wide receiver hasn’t been in the Pro Bowl since 2007. Since then, Michael Turner, Roddy White, Tony Gonzalez, Devonta Freeman, Austin Hooper and Jones have represented Atlanta. — Michael Rothstein

Carolina Panthers

Pro Bowlers: None

Carolina had a few players that deserved attention and they might have made it as alternates if those were being selected. Defensive end Brian Burns, who with eight sacks, three forced fumbles, 20 quarterback hits and seven tackles for loss, emerged as one of the best pass rushers in the NFL and ranked in the top five in pass rush win rate. Wide receivers Robby Anderson and DJ Moore both eclipsed 1,000 yards receiving to rank in the top 10, but they they scored six TDs between them.

Did you know? This is the first time since 2012 (Luke Kuechly’s rookie year) Carolina didn’t have a player selected to the all-star team. Kuechly made it the next seven seasons before retiring. — David Newton

New Orleans Saints

Pro Bowlers: Cameron Jordan, DE (6), Alvin Kamara, RB (4), Marshon Lattimore, CB (3), Terron Armstead, OT (3), Andrus Peat, G (3)

This list is a little thinner than last year, when the Saints had a team-record seven players selected and wound up with 11, including alternates. Drew Brees and Michael Thomas are notable absences in injury plagued seasons. Other notable snubs: LB Demario Davis and RT Ryan Ramczyk, who have still never made the Pro Bowl despite being named first-team All-Pro last year; and DE Trey Hendrickson, who is tied for the NFL sack lead with 12.5. Kamara, who is arguably the most deserving name on this year’s list, has now made the Pro Bowl in all four years of his career (twice as an alternate).

Did you know? Brees missed out on the chance to tie Tom Brady, Peyton Manning, Tony Gonzalez, Merlin Olsen and Bruce Matthews for the NFL record with 14 Pro Bowl selections. Of course, Brady also missed out on the chance to move into first place by himself. No respect for the old guard. — Mike Triplett

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Pro Bowlers: Jason Pierre-Paul, LB (3)

One year after fracturing two vertebrae in his neck, with some in the Bucs’ organization wondering if he’d ever be able to play football again, Pierre-Paul was selected to the Pro Bowl for the third time in his career and first time as a Buccaneer (his other two appearances came in 2011 and 2012 as a member of the New York Giants). Pierre-Paul’s 9.5 sacks are seventh-most in the league and third among outside linebackers. Pierre-Paul is the only player in the league this season with 5.0-sacks and multiple interceptions (2).

Did you know? The Bucs and Dolphins, both 9-5, are the only two teams with winning records to not have multiple Pro Bowlers, according to ESPN Statistics & Information. The Bucs’ biggest snub is Devin White, who has 8.0 sacks, 130 combined tackles, 13 tackles for a loss, a forced fumble and fumble recovery from the inside linebacker position. — Jenna Laine

NFC WEST

Arizona Cardinals

Pro Bowlers: Kyler Murray, QB (1); DeAndre Hopkins, WR (5); Budda Baker, SS (3)

Murray was selected to his first Pro Bowl after being named an alternate last season. Murray is second in the league among quarterbacks in rushing yards and tied for first with 11 rushing touchdowns while throwing for 3,637 yards thus far. Murray’s favorite target is also going to the Pro Bowl. Hopkins was selected to his fifth Pro Bowl and fourth straight. He leads the NFL in receiving yards (1,324) and is second in receptions (103), eclipsing 1,000 yards for the fourth straight year and 100 receptions for the third. Baker’s second straight Pro Bowl selection came on the heels of him becoming the highest paid safety in the NFL. He’s continued to show he’s worth the money with 104 tackles, two picks, two sacks and a forced fumble.

Did you know? Murray is the first quarterback in Cardinals history to be selected to the Pro Bowl within his first two NFL seasons and he is the youngest quarterback (23) to earn a Pro Bowl nod for the franchise. — Josh Weinfuss

Los Angeles Rams

Pro Bowlers: Aaron Donald, DT (7), Jalen Ramsey, CB (4)

Donald has earned Pro Bowl honors every season since he was drafted with the 13th overall selection in 2014, while Ramsey earns his fourth consecutive Pro Bowl nod. Both have contributed significantly to a defense that ranks second in efficiency this season. Donald is tied for first in the NFL, along with New Orleans Saints defensive end Trey Hendrickson, with 12.5 sacks and he ranks second in the league with 49 pressures. Ramsey has proven his versatility under first-year coordinator Brandon Staley, not only maintaining his status as a premier lockdown corner versus some of the top receivers in the league, but also demonstrating that he can play inside, outside and even lineup as a hybrid linebacker. Ramsey has one interception and three pass breakups this season.

Did you know? This is the second consecutive season that Donald and Ramsey are the Rams’ only Pro Bowl picks. — Lindsey Thiry

San Francisco 49ers

Pro Bowlers: Kyle Juszczyk, FB (5), Fred Warner, LB (1), Trent Williams, LT (8)

With many of their obvious Pro Bowl talents spending most of the year dealing with injuries, the Niners still managed to have three selected. This is five consecutive Pro Bowl berths for Juszczyk, who continues to be the gold standard at his position. After a year away from football, Williams has mostly returned to form and reclaimed his spot as one of the best tackles in the league. For as good as Warner has been, it’s a surprise this is only his first selection but it’s probably one of many to come. One thing all three San Francisco Pro Bowlers have in common? They’re set to cash in on new contracts or extensions this offseason.

Did you know? Williams is the first 49ers offensive tackle not named Joe Staley to be selected for the Pro Bowl since Harris Barton in 1993, which is fitting since the Niners traded for Williams to be the retired Staley’s replacement.— Nick Wagoner

Seattle Seahawks

Pro Bowlers: Russell Wilson, QB (8) DK Metcalf, WR (1), Bobby Wagner, LB, (7), Jamal Adams, SS, (3), Quandre Diggs, FS, (1), Nick Bellore, ST, (1), Tyler Ott, LS, (1)

Wilson was a no-brainer while ranking second in passing touchdowns with a franchise-record 37. Same with Metcalf, who’s third among receivers with 1,223 yards. Wagner, a Pro Bowl fixture, is sixth in the NFL in tackles while Adams’ 9.5 sacks are the most by a DB in NFL history. That made them easy calls as well. Duane Brown (tied for third among tackles in ESPN’s Pass Block Win Rate) had a strong case for the Pro Bowl as did Michael Dickson, who is fourth in net punting average and has downed a league-high six punts inside the 5 (though two came Sunday). Jason Myers is 20 for 20 on field goals, including a franchise-record 61-yarder, but the Falcons’ Younghoe Koo was more deserving for the NFC’s lone nod as he’s gone 35 of 36.

Did you know? The Seahawks’ seven Pro Bowl selections is tied for the most in club history. Wilson, Metcalf, Wagner, Diggs and Bellore topped their positions in NFC fan voting, with Wilson receiving the second-most fan votes league-wide behind Patrick Mahomes. Wilson’s eight Pro Bowls are tied with Cortez Kennedy for second-most in club history behind Walter Jones’ nine. — Brady Henderson

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