Italian wonderkid quits football after landing Harvard University spot

A transfer for an 18-year-old, untested Italian forward would rarely make headlines across the world.

But Alessandro Arlotti’s decision to swap Serie B for Ivy League has certainly done that.

Arlotti, born in France to Italian parents had enjoyed an impressive youth career, one that saw him become captain of Monaco’s Under-17 team in 2019.

In September of last year, the winger moved back to the home of his parents, signing for Pescara.

However, just months later, Arlotti has decided to put his professional career on hold after earning a place at Harvard University in America.

The college in Massachusetts is widely regarded as one of the prestigious institutions in the world, with only the brightest academics offered a place.

But posting on his social media, Arlotti has confirmed he will be moving to the States, where he will also play for their Crimson soccer team.

Arlotti has made the bench on two occasions this season, with Pescara battling against relegation the third tier.

Most of his football has come in the Primavera, but he will now be focusing on the NCAA schedules as he flies across the Atlantic.

He is now set to begin courses in a matter of weeks as he looks to earn himself a highly respected qualifications.

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  • Although he looks likely to continue playing sports, Harvard, unlike some other colleges, doesn’t have a rich history of producing professional athletes.

    NFL quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick is arguably the most famous alumni, while Jeremy Lin also rose to prominence with the New York Knicks in the NBA.

    As for football players, Andre Akpan enjoyed a brief career in MLS, playing for the likes of New York Red Bulls and Colorado Rapids, while Michael Fucito made over 50 appearances during his professional career.

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