Liverpool PULL PLUG on Timo Werner transfer and end talks with RB Leipzig striker

Liverpool have reportedly refused to pay Timo Werner’s £52million release clause and withdrawn from negotiations with RB Leipzig. The Reds were closing in on an agreement before the coronavirus outbreak.

But Liverpool’s finances have been hit hard by the lack of revenue in the last two months while matches have been postponed.

Werner has flirted with the prospect of moving to Anfield next summer and will have only done his hopes well by netting a hat-trick against Mainz at the weekend.

However, the Mirror claim Liverpool will stand firm and pay no more than £30m at the end of the season.

A similar stance is being undertook by the Bundesliga club as they will not drop their valuation below £50m.

That means talks have hit an impasse and Liverpool will no longer pursue the forward this year.

Transfers are expected to be heavily affected by the global pandemic as fees are set to drop in the next window.

Clubs will have much less money to spend given the lack of matches played over recent months.

However, Leipzig CEO Oliver Mintzlaff insists his side do not need to recoup any cash by flogging their top stars on the cheap.

“It won’t get any cheaper,” the chief said of Werner. “We will not sell a player below value if he is under contract for more than a year.

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“In general, we always ask the question: can we replace a player if we sell him for less than his market value?”

Meanwhile, Leipzig boss Julian Nagelsmann has recently admitted his star is considering walking away from the club.

“He is in a good mood, feels good and trains well,” Nagelsmann told Sport Bild.

“I do not have the impression that he is carrying a large cross with him. But he is a young guy who is sure to sit at home with his girlfriend and ponder whether he will stay or change.

“When the question is in the room, you are always a little bit somewhere else. It was no different for me than when in Hoffenheim, it was about whether I go away.

“It is more obvious with strikers, because then there are phases in which they do not score.”

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