Lord Kamlesh Patel got on the front foot as new Yorkshire chair

RICHARD GIBSON: His voice broke with emotion at times, but Lord Kamlesh Patel got on the front foot with a powerful entrance as he promises better future for all at Yorkshire

  • Lord Kamlesh Patel grew up a dozen miles down the road in Bradford 
  • Press conference as Yorkshire’s new chair took place in Headingley’s east stand 
  • Patel vowed to devote himself to providing a better future for all at a cricket club 
  • He recalled his own experiences as a youth, having moved from Kenya aged one 

‘I want to find the next Joe Root, the next Virat Kohli, the next Babar Azam. This is their home, as it is my home. In years to come, I am saying the door is wide open. Come and live your dreams here.’

As entrances go, this was a pretty powerful one from Lord Kamlesh Patel, who grew up a dozen miles down the road in Bradford.

The press conference was held in Headingley’s east stand, the walls of which house Yorkshire’s cricket museum and are adorned by pictures of players past and present. 

As entrances go, this was a pretty powerful one from new Yorkshire chair Lord Kamlesh Patel

The press conference was held in Headingley’s east stand, the walls of which house Yorkshire’s cricket museum

At the centre of the display is Ashes-winning captain Michael Vaughan, who ‘completely and categorically denies’ the racist comment he is accused of making in the Azeem Rafiq report. 

Alongside him is Richie Richardson, the former West Indies captain. India great Sachin Tendulkar — Yorkshire’s first overseas player — points his bat at them both. On the left of four panels, Adil Rashid unfurls a leg-break flanked by Brian Close and Sir Geoffrey Boycott. Some all-time greats. Some pretty diverse backgrounds.

Through the thick Yorkshire accent of which he is openly proud, Patel vowed to devote himself to providing a better future for all at a cricket club that he insists will once again be considered the best in the world. 

Patel vowed to devote himself to providing a better future for all at a cricket club following the Azeem Rafiq (above) report

There were times when his voice broke with emotion, including when he recalled his own experiences as a youth, having moved from Kenya at the age of one.

He became a fast runner, he said, by evading skinheads intent on ‘P**i-bashing’. It was cricket that saved him. When he was named school captain, the bullying stopped.

Now, he wants to save the county from its biggest crisis. He is a caring and connected man, as one would expect of someone with a stellar career of pioneering social work. On Monday, it was hard to miss his message that the Yorkshire of years to come will be one for all people.

https://sportstons.com/soccer/exc-ed-woodward-is-in-talks-to-take-on-a-consultancy-role-at-man-utd/

Patel recalled his own experiences as a youth, having moved from Kenya at the age of one

The ECB’s Independent Commission for Equity in Cricket (ICEC) has opened its call for evidence to examine discrimination and inequity in cricket. 

The ICEC will deal with lived experiences, with the window opening today and closing on December 21, and written evidence, which will begin next month.




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