Wolves players required to bring their own ball to training

Wolves players required to bring their own ball to training to prevent spread of coronavirus as they continue individual sessions ahead of tests

  • Wolves players returned for individual training sessions last week   
  • They will soon be checked for Covid-19 in the drive-through test centre
  • Conor Coady has given an insight into the new training procedures 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Wolves players are required to bring their own footballs to training to prevent the spread of coronavirus as they prepare to undergo tests in the coming days.

Nuno Espirito Santo’s squad resumed individual training sessions last week and will soon be checked for Covid-19 in the drive-through test centre constructed in the car park of their training ground.

Project Restart remains beset by uncertainty, with players expressing doubts about their safety if the Premier League resumes next month – and Wolves skipper Conor Coady has advocated ‘little steps at a time’ as they work towards a resumption.

Wolves players bringing their own footballs to training to prevent the spread of Covid-19

He said: ‘It’s such a cautious situation. We all want that date to say Wolves are playing whoever on June 12 or 13, we’re all looking forward to it, but we realise as human beings that this is such a tough situation that we’re in. I think it’s important we take little steps at a time.

‘[The talks between Premier League captains have] been fantastic, coming together quite often to try to move this situation forward,” said Coady.

‘Everyone wants to move forward. We know how tough it is, how Covid is affecting certain families – it’s absolutely horrible. ‘Hopefully, we can move forward and the Premier League will do what they need to do to move things forward.

‘I can understand the different points of view. We’ve all got families and people will make their own decisions.’

Every Wolves player was asked to report for individual fitness sessions last week

Wolves are sixth in the table and still involved in the Europa League, meaning they will have plenty to play for if the action resumes.   

Players are prevented from entering the buildings at Compton and have been restricted to groups of four, maintaining social distancing and working with one of the club’s fitness coaches.

Coady told Sky Sports: ‘It’s four players at a time, on a pitch each. It’s tough because we’re not allowed to use cones, poles, mannequins or goals – we’ve got to bring our own ball which then gets cleaned.

English defender Conor Coady has given an insight into the new training procedures

‘They take your temperature when you go in and then we’re going to be tested (for coronavirus) in the next few days.

‘You’ve got your coach in the middle and he’s obviously got a mask on and gloves – 20, 30 or 40 yards away from you, shouting what he wants from you. You get an hour slot, so, for example, if you’re in at 9am you’ve got until 10am.

‘You just walk around to the pitch as you’re not allowed into the building. It’s something where they’re trying to keep you out of the building. We understand the situation, you’re following markings on the floor – running from this circle to that circle. It’s non-stop running and it’s tough.’ 


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England players to return to training next week

England players will begin individual training next week in the first step to returning to action after the coronavirus shutdown.

Bowlers will have staggered sessions at various county grounds with a coach, physio and, where possible, a strength and conditioning coach in attendance.

Other players will return to practice two weeks later.

“These are very tentative steps to returning to play,” said England director of cricket Ashley Giles.

There will be no cricket in England or Wales until at least 1 July, a shutdown which has meant the postponement of the Test series against West Indies, which was scheduled for June.

  • West Indies players ‘very nervous’ about travelling to England
  • Some anxieties about return to action – Buttler

With the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) in talks with Cricket West Indies (CWI) over the rescheduling of those three Tests, Giles said the return to training coincides with a seven-week build-up to what could be the start of the series on 8 July.

About 30 players – centrally contracted and from the county system – will be invited to train at 11 venues. The players and venues will be confirmed on Monday. The ECB will also use some county coaches and staff.

On Wednesday, the government issued guidelines on how elite athletes were able to return to training, with further guidance on greater contact between players and coaches due in the coming weeks.

In line with government advice, the ECB will implement the following protocols:

  • Each individual will observe strict social-distancing
  • Players and support staff will arrive in training kit ready to practise
  • Players and support staff will have their temperatures taken before they are allowed to take part
  • Medical staff will wear personal protective equipment (PPE) to treat injuries. The PPE will be sourced and funded by the ECB
  • Dressing rooms and other venue facilities will be closed

England’s women will return to training in late June, while the ECB is expecting to provide an update on when the 18 first-class counties can return to training by the end of May.

“This first phase should be a safer environment than going about daily life,” said Giles.

“I’m not making light of this, but there are risks every time you go outside the house. We need to mitigate as many of the risks around the spreading of this virus as we possibly can.”

It is likely that any international cricket that is played this summer – England are also due to host Pakistan, Australia and Ireland – will be played behind closed doors, perhaps in a ‘bio-secure’ environment.

Previous discussions have involved the prospect of players remaining within the team environment for the duration of the summer in order to minimise the risk of infection.

However, Giles said this is not “realistic” given the various home circumstances of the players. For example, the wife of Test captain Joe Root is expecting their second child.

“We are going to have to find ways where we can get players out of their environment,” said Giles.

“Our players will do anything they can to get this going, but it isn’t realistic to expect them to be in a bubble for 10 weeks.”

On Wednesday, CWI chief executive Johnny Grave said some West Indies players would be “very nervous” about travelling to England.

“We are all nervous, aren’t we?” Giles said. “I went shopping last week and it’s a really weird feeling when you go out. You are almost threatened by anyone who comes near you. That will change over time.

“It can be quite scary but we are doing everything we possibly can to answer all of the West Indies’ questions.”

  • Play crowd noise at games behind closed doors – Archer

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Jens Lehmann says players 'have to cope' with coronavirus

‘You have to get on with it’: Jens Lehmann says players ‘have to cope’ with coronavirus and insists that for people ‘with a strong immune system, it is not a big concern’ after recovering from the illness himself

  • Jens Lehmann believes footballers have to get on with playing again
  • Seasons across Europe have been suspended due to the coronavirus outbreak
  • Germany’s Bundesliga is due to return with a full round of fixtures this weekend 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Jens Lehmann has dismissed coronavirus as ‘not a big concern’ for footballers ahead of the return of the Bundesliga this weekend.

The German top flight will become the first major European league to return on Saturday with the Premier League hoping to return next month and France’s Ligue 1 already cancelling their season.

And the former Arsenal goalkeeper insists that players will just have to get on with it, with the Bundesliga carrying on despite three positive tests at Cologne and Dynamo Dresden being forced to postpone their game after going into quarantine. 

Former goalkeeper Jens Lehmann believes coronavirus is ‘not a big concern’ for footballers

‘In the end, you have to live with it, because the only thing that this lockdown is based on is the hope that eventually we are going to find a vaccine or some medicine which cures it. But there’s only hope,’ Lehmann told beIN Sports.

‘So far we don’t have anything. Because of that, you cannot shut down everything. So you have to get on with it.’

The former German international has recovered from coronavirus himself and claims catching the virus should not be a major concern for players. 

‘As long as the symptoms are not that bad, I think players have to cope with it,’ Lehmann added.

The former German international suffered from coronavirus but has since recovered

Dynamo Dresden squad are forced into quarantine after two players test positive for COVID-19

‘We have plenty of players who were actually infected, and most of them did not even show any symptoms.

‘So I think for young, healthy, people with a strong immune system it’s not such a big concern.’

The Bundesliga gets underway on Saturday with Schalke facing Borussia Dortmund in the first game since the season was suspended over two months ago. 




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Players testing waters for 2020 NBA Draft will make grim discovery: ‘That process doesn’t exist this year’

When the deadline for aspiring professional basketball players to file for early entry to the NBA Draft passed just before Sunday turned to Monday, it was known to contain the names of nearly 160 players who participated in NCAA basketball in the 2019-20 season.

A few of those are no-doubt/no-brainer lottery picks, such as Dayton’s Obi Toppin and Georgia’s Anthony Edwards. Some are unlikely to be chosen in prominent draft positions, such as Kentucky guard Immanuel Quickley, but have determined they wish to begin their professional careers, regardless.

And some are seeking to experience the pre-draft process, to learn more about how NBA teams view them, perhaps to dazzle one or more teams with a surprisingly spectacular performance in a setting different than a college practice or game. In the vernacular, they are “testing the waters.”

All the pools are closed, though. There is no water. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, there almost certainly will be no NBA Combine in 2020, no individual-team workouts for a player to experience the protocols and perhaps demonstrate to teams that there is more to his game than shown to date.

Why, then, are there so many players on that list?

One high-major coach who had a player enter said this: “He’s just putting his name in because it’s the cool thing to do.”

That appears to be the only logical explanation.

“We typically have a robust process for underclassmen, and I place a high value on it. But the wheels are not even turning,” one Western Conference executive told Sporting News. “That process doesn’t exist this year.

“We’re not going to be having workouts, as far as I can tell. I like bringing in the underclassmen to test, and it’s very valuable. We can’t even watch a workout of a kid on video, because that would put kids in gyms when they shouldn’t be there.”

Darius Days averaged 11.1 points in 23 minutes per game for LSU. Brendan Bailey averaged 7.1 points as a sophomore at Marquette. Dexter Dennis averaged 9.2 points in his second year at Wichita State. All filed for NBA early entry.

There are more accomplished players on the list, as well, including Sporting News Player of the Year Luka Garza of Iowa and wing Cory Kispert of Gonzaga.

Any of these players, if interested, had the opportunity to receive an evaluation from the NBA’s undergraduate advisory committee. It was not necessary to file for early entry to receive this draft grade, which comprises evaluation from all 30 teams and a five-person leadership committee. A player who asks for the advisory committee grade will be told whether he is a likely lottery pick, a late first-rounder, a second-rounder or expected to be undrafted.

“There are so many guys that applied for the advisory committee that I’ve never heard of,” the Western Conference executive said. “And I’m not even sure I’m ashamed to admit that.”

In this uncommon circumstance, the advisory committee was about as far as it was necessary to take the process for those who are considered to be testing. However, many choose not to believe the assessments they receive.

“Some of these kids get that feedback and think it’s just rigged. It’s not. The NBA does a really thorough job of asking,” one Eastern Conference executive told SN. “They’re so diligent with getting the right amount of feedback. They’ve really standardized it over the past three years. They’re not leaving it to the device of individual teams.

“You have to put hard numbers on it now. And some kids get that feedback and say, ‘Nah, it’s not real.’”

The Eastern Conference executive told SN that he feels for those players who will be denied the opportunity to go through the NCAA Draft process. It’s not as rough as losing the opportunity to play in league championship tournaments or the NCAAs, but it’s one more blow in a rugged spring for college basketball players.

A year ago, power forward Reggie Perry of Mississippi State finished his freshman season with a flourish, helped the Bulldogs get into the NCAA Tournament and then filed for early entry. He had displayed enough potential to be invited to the NBA Combine.

“He interviewed well, played well, then decided to take his name out, played USA Basketball and was incredible at the U19 World Championship. So we have information on him,” the Eastern exec said. “Some of these guys are not going to have that same level of exposure.

“This more hurts these kids, and I don’t know if they’re getting the most responsible amount of feedback. They want to participate, and they’ve seen their peers involved, but there is no combine. Sorry. I feel badly for them.”

In a typical year, the opportunity to experience the draft process can be a positive even if the player expects to return for another year of NCAA basketball. It’s can be like a hybrid of a summer internship and a first attempt at taking the SAT.

As with an internship in journalism or accounting or business, the player gets to see what the professional world is like, meet some of the principals, perhaps make a strong impression with an interview or an obvious work ethic. As with that first lap through a standardized test, the athlete gets exposed to the procedures, to what is expected, to whatever little devices might promote success when it’s time to take the shot that will count.

“The feedback part is great, but this is just different,” the Eastern conference exec told SN. “They’ve seen all their peers do it, so they want to say, ‘Yeah, I declared for the draft.’ But you got no feedback.”

Entering the draft is not without risk for the athlete. A negative first impression can endure among the scouts and personnel executives who eventually will determine whether to employ him. But that’s a chance many athletes are delighted to take because they believe in their ability and want the opportunity to show it to the people who can help them to achieve their dreams.

Essentially none of this will happen this spring. A player may be able to get an online video interview with a team, but not a lot more. And those are likely to be limited to the players who have a serious chance to be selected.

“It’s not like teams will say, ‘Here’s the underclassman list, let’s start rolling through interviews A to Z,’” the Western exec told SN. “There’s only so many Zoom calls we can ask our staff to sit in on.”

Players can make agreements with agents while they’re on the early-entry list, so long as they’re NCAA-certified. According to the college coach, many top agents don’t bother with certification because they’re not interested in trying to talk marginal prospects out of school on the off-chance they might be chosen. There’s not much an agent can do for a player this year; possibly the prospect could be flown to a state where gyms are open to get some workouts in, but as of now teams would not be permitted to observe in any way.

One reason there are so many marginal prospects on the early-entry list is many college coaches have determined that the most prudent approach with players who express a desire is to tell them to go ahead.

“I tell them, ‘If you’re even thinking about it, put your name in,’” the high-major coach said. “If they don’t, they’re going to blame me.”

That puts NBA teams in the position of having to explain to aspiring pros that they are not ready to be chosen. If the college coach says it, that can create a divide with the player. If someone in the league says it, the college coach can’t be charged with just trying to keep a player in his program to win more games.

It almost seems as if players are filing for the draft so they can have the opportunity to make a Twitter announcement and then, upon their return to college basketball, issue another that proclaims how committed they are to winning for their program’s fans.

The truth: Villanova did a press release when forward Jeremiah Robinson-Earl said he would not be filing for early entry. Kentucky did that, as well, for Keion Brooks. Robinson-Earl got 1,200 likes for a Twitter post that simply said, “Excited for next season! #NovaNation #UnfinishedBusiness”

This year, because of the pandemic, sending out the “coming back” tweet is about the same whether a player enters the draft or not.

“To me, don’t be silly. Don’t try to reach for something that isn’t there yet,” the Western Conference executive told SN. “We don’t have time to be the people who do the ass-kicking this year.”

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Players may face choice over women’s Rugby World Cup or Olympic Games in 2021

Players may have to choose between the Olympic Games and the women’s Rugby World Cup in 2021 after World Rugby confirmed the dates of the tournament in New Zealand will not change.

The World Cup starts on 18 September, just six weeks after the conclusion of the postponed Tokyo Olympic Games which now run from 23 July to 8 August.

Some countries rely heavily on female athletes switching between codes.

That means some individuals could have to choose which event to play in.

In England women’s players are now contracted to either Sevens or XVs, while in countries like France, Wales and Canada players can switch between the disciplines throughout the year.

“Some players may have to make a choice of either/or, but there are certainly players that coaches feel could probably do both,” World Rugby’s Head of Competitions and Performance Mark Egan said.

“The majority of unions are very comfortable they can work with this even though it is going to be challenging.”

The women’s Olympic Rugby Sevens will run in the first week of the Tokyo Games meaning any athlete hoping to compete in both events will have a seven-week turnaround.

World Rugby understands the numbers of dual code players has dropped since the Rio Olympics in 2016 and Egan believes this will eventually end.

“The feedback we’re getting is there are fewer athletes this time round for Tokyo playing both forms of the game,” he said.

“I think further down the line you will see complete separation.”

World Rugby has been in constant dialogue with all unions since the announcement that the Olympic Games would be postponed because of coronavirus and confirmed one union did request World Cup 2021 be moved back by a month.

This is not possible because New Zealand is hosting a major trade forum, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, in November.

Egan explained: “We have to work with the dates we have.

“There’s very little chance it (RWC 2021) can be moved later because you’re coming up against that event, there’s very little hotel availability and there’s all kinds of issues around hosting two major events like that at the same time.”

There had been suggestions the tournament could move to 2022 but Egan said the tournament “can’t move” because of fixture congestion involving the Birmingham Commonwealth Games in July and August and the Sevens Rugby World Cup in Cape Town in September.

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Players, media share memories of Oilers forward Colby Cave

Edmonton Oilers forward Colby Cave died Saturday morning. He was 25. Cave’s family released a statement announcing the news.

“It is with great sadness to share the news that our Colby Cave passed away early this morning. I (Emily, Colby’s wife) and both our families are in shock but know our Colby was loved dearly by us, his family and friends, the entire hockey community, and many more. We thank everyone for their prayers during this difficult time.”

The Oilers released a statement reading, “We want to express our deepest condolences to the family and friends after the passing of our teammate Colby Cave earlier this morning. Colby was a terrific teammate with great character, admired and liked everywhere he played. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his wife Emily, his family and friends at this very difficult time.”

Boston Bruins released statements from president Cam Neely, general manager Don Sweeney, head coach Bruce Cassidy, captains Zdeno Chara and Patrice Bergeron and forward Jake DeBrusk.

NHL commissioner Gary Bettman released a statement on the passing of Cave.

Remembrances flooded social media as the hockey world reacted to the news of Cave’s death.

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‘NBA 2K’ Players Tournament bracket: Full schedule, results, scores for ESPN’s players-only tournament

The quarterfinals of the “NBA 2K” Players Tournament — a video game competition between NBA stars — will feature just one player older than 26.

Outside of undisputed trash talk champ Patrick Beverley, 31, the second stage of the tournament is filled with the league’s next generation of top talent. Trae Young, DeAndre Ayton and Devin Booker are prime examples of players the NBA wants to showcase as much as possible.

ESPN2 will show all four quarterfinals matchups live on Thursday night, while ESPN will carry the semifinals on Saturday.

The level of play will hopefully improve now that 2K newbies have been eliminated. Most of the remaining competitors are well-versed on the sticks, with the likes of Ayton and Booker familiar with streaming their gaming online.

‘NBA 2K’ Players Tournament bracket



(2K Sports)

Players Tournament bracket
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Here’s a look at the full schedule for the players-only tournament:

Quarterfinals

The quarterfinals will take place on Thursday, April 8.

Semifinals

The semifinals will take place on Saturday, April 11.

‘NBA 2K’ Players Tournament TV schedule

Here is the TV broadcast schedule for the entire “NBA 2K” Players Tournament. The tournament can be streamed through the ESPN app and ach of the NBA’s social channels on Twitter (@NBA2K, @NBA), Twitch, YouTube and Facebook, but only after the live broadcast on ESPN is finished.

Prize for winning Players Tournament

The NBA player that wins the “NBA 2K” bracket will claim $100,000 to donate to a coronavirus-related charity of his choice. 

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PL players claim clubs could offer 'far more' in coronavirus crisis

Premier League stars break their silence on the pay-cut row to SLAM Matt Hancock and league bosses as they say 30 per cent cut would see £200m in tax lost… and claim football’s £20m NHS donation ‘could be more’

  • PFA have issued statement calling for clubs to do more amid coronavirus crisis
  • Premier League proposed £20m donation plus measures including wage cut 
  • Statement claimed a 30 per cent wage cut would cost £200million in lost taxes
  • The players criticised Health Secretary Matt Hancock over the demand

 The country’s top footballers have spoken out over the Premier League pay-cut row in an extraordinary statement criticising health secretary Matt Hancock and their own bosses over plans to take 30 per cent off their huge wages amid the coranovirus pandemic.

On Friday, Premier League clubs proposed to raise £20million for charitable causes, advance £125million to support clubs in the EFL and National League and initiate a 30 per cent salary cut/deferral across 12 months for Premier League players. 

But in a statement on Saturday the Professional Footballers’ Association warned a wage cut could cost up to £200m in lost taxes and called on clubs to do more to support NHS staff and key workers. 

Premier League players have pledged to support clubs and non-playing staff amid coronavirus

Health Secretary Matt Hancock was criticised over his call for players to take a wage cut

The statement said: ‘All Premier League players want to, and will, play their part in making significant financial contributions in these unprecedented times.

‘All Premier League players fully appreciate their role and responsibilities in society during this current crisis. 

‘They care deeply for those who are suffering with loss, health and hardship at the moment.’ 

The statement added: ‘We cannot stress enough that football is in this together. Solidarity and putting aside any self-interest is paramount. 

Liverpool captain Jordan Henderson had been in talks with fellow Premier League skippers

Premier League players say that the £20m donation to the NHS could be more

 ‘£20m us welcome but we believe it could be far bigger.

‘The EFL money is an advance. Importantly, it will aid cashflow in the immediate, but football needs to find a way to increase funding to the EFL and non-league clubs in the long-term.

‘Many clubs require an increase in funding just to survive. We believe in our football pyramid and again stress the need for solidarity between all clubs.

‘Going forward, we are working together to find a solution which will be continually reviewed in order to assess the circumstance of the COVID-19 crisis.

PFA chief executive Gordon Taylor had been in discussions with clubs over the measures

Richard Masters, chief executive of Premier League, had made a series of proposals

‘The players are mindful that as PAYE employees, the combined tax on their salaries is a significant contribution to funding essential public services – which are especially critical at this time. Taking a 30% salary deduction will cost the Exchequer substantial sums. This would be detrimental to our NHS and other government-funded services.

‘The proposed 30% salary deduction over a 12-month period equates to over £500m in wage reductions and a loss in tax contributions of over £200m to the government. 

‘What effect does this loss of earning to the government mean for the NHS? Was this considered in the Premier League proposal and did the Health Secretary, Matt Hancock factor this in when asking players to take a salary cut?

‘We welcomed the opportunity to discuss this with the Premier League today and we are happy to continue talks.’

THE PFA’S FULL STATEMENT

All Premier League players want to, and will, play their part in making significant financial contributions in these unprecedented times.

All Premier League players fully appreciate their role and responsibilities in society during this current crisis. They care deeply for those who are suffering with loss, health and hardship at the moment.

Discussions about how players can best financially contribute have been ongoing during the current crisis, and prior to yesterday’s announcement by the Premier League.

The Premier League players want to take the lead and ensure their financial contributions will support:

• Our clubs that we play for will obviously need our support, particularly if this crisis goes beyond June.

• Non-playing staff at our Premier League clubs – guaranteeing they receive 100% of their wages.

• EFL and non-league clubs, their staff and players.

• The NHS – whose workers – many of whom are football fans – are doing so much for us all. They are the real heroes.

We cannot stress enough that football is in this together. Solidarity and putting aside any self-interest is paramount.

To re-cap what the Premier League proposed within the announcement yesterday:

· £20m to charitable causes.

· Advancing £125m to the EFL and National League clubs.

· A 12-month 30% salary cut/deferral in wages for Premier League players.

£20m is welcome, but we believe it could be far bigger.

The EFL money is an advance. Importantly, it will aid cashflow in the immediate, but football needs to find a way to increase funding to the EFL and non-league clubs in the long-term.

Many clubs require an increase in funding just to survive. We believe in our football pyramid and again stress the need for solidarity between all clubs.

Going forward, we are working together to find a solution which will be continually reviewed in order to assess the circumstance of the COVID-19 crisis.

The players are mindful that as PAYE employees, the combined tax on their salaries is a significant contribution to funding essential public services – which are especially critical at this time. Taking a 30% salary deduction will cost the Exchequer substantial sums. This would be detrimental to our NHS and other government-funded services.

The proposed 30% salary deduction over a 12-month period equates to over £500m in wage reductions and a loss in tax contributions of over £200m to the government. What effect does this loss of earning to the government mean for the NHS? Was this considered in the Premier League proposal and did the Health Secretary, Matt Hancock factor this in when asking players to take a salary cut?

We welcomed the opportunity to discuss this with the Premier League today and we are happy to continue talks.

It is our priority to finalise the precise details of our commitment as soon as possible. However, to achieve a collective position for all Premier League players – of which there are many different financial and contractual circumstances from club-to-club – will take a bit more time.

The PFA Charity has also agreed to make a substantial contribution to a player-led initiative once the details are finalised.

There should be no doubting the players and captains are committed to achieving this as soon as possible. They recognise their role in wider society and what they need to do, as a group, to help and support others.




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Ranking 68 greatest players of March Madness expanded-bracket era

College basketball transformed into the widely followed sport that it is today — that we miss so dearly now — as a result of the expansion of the NCAA Tournament to 64 teams 35 years ago.

NCAA senior vice president of basketball Dan Gavitt, whose father Dave was among those on the committee that approved the change, said one reason it was such a wild success was the appeal of the players in the sport at that time — legendary names such as Ewing, Mullin and Bias.

BUILDING THE BRACKET: How the 1985 NCAA Tournament turned March into Madness

In honor of the anniversary, and to match with the tournament’s current field of 68 format, Sporting News endeavored to rank the 68 greatest players of the expanded bracket era, which began with the 1984-85 season and continues today. So Michael Jordan, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton and Pete Maravich are not eligible. Some great players who are eligible still had to be excluded — but that’s how amazing the players who made it were.

The list isn’t about who became the best pro, nor is it a list of NBA all-time greats. And there was the issue of what to do with players whose careers began before expansion; in those cases, their full careers were considered.

Seasons: Four (1985-89)
Final Fours: One (1989)
NCAA titles: One (1989)
Career points: 2,442

Seasons: Four (2010-14)
Final Fours: Two (2011, 2014)
NCAA titles: Two (2011, 2014)
Career points: 1,959

Seasons: Four (2013-17)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,885

Seasons: Four (1995-99)
Final Fours: One (1998)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,618

Seasons: Four (2012-16)
Final Fours: One (2016)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,291

Seasons: Four (1993-97)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,542

Seasons: Four (2011-15)
Final Fours: Two (2014, 2015)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,458

Seasons: Three (2001-04)
Final Fours: One (2004)
NCAA titles: (2004)
Career points: 1,426

Seasons: 3 (2003-06)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,867

Seasons: Two (2007-09)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,278

Seasons: Three (1993-96)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,922

Seasons: Two (1992-94)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 878

Seasons: Three (1982-85)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,716

Seasons: Four (1985-89)
Final Fours: One (1986)
NCAA titles: One (1986)
Career points: 2,143

Seasons: Two (1994-96)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,539

Seasons: Two (1991-93)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,319

Seasons: Two (1989-1991)
Final Fours: One (1990)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,497

Seasons: Four (1986-90)
Final Fours: One (1987)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,143

Seasons: Four (1988-1992)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,001

Seasons: Four
Final Fours: Three (1990, 1991, 1992)
NCAA titles: Two (1991, 1992)
Career points: 1,924

Seasons: Four (1991-95)
Final Fours: One (1995)
NCAA titles: One (1995)
Career points: 1,815

Seasons: Four (1985-89)
Final Fours: Three (1986, 1988, 1989)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,155

Seasons: Three (1989-1992)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,785

Legacy: Jackson was one of the most coveted recruits in Ohio State history and delivered on expectations, scoring 16.1 points as a freshman, advancing to 22.4 as a senior and playing for three teams that reached the NCAA Tournament. He was a 50 percent career shooter who also delivered four assists and just under six rebounds per game. The Buckeyes won consecutive Big Ten titles in his final two years.

Seasons: Two (1988-90)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,854

Legacy: There was no more beautiful offensive player than the man formerly known as Chris Jackson. He had not only every shot from every angle, but also a complete understanding of how to use the board, how to create space against a defender and how to occasionally move far enough from the goal that no defender would expect him to make the shot. (But he did).

Seasons: Four (1985-86, USC); (1988-90, Loyola Marymount)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,723

Legacy: Gathers was a vital, dynamic force of nature whom college opponents couldn’t stop, whether they came from the West Coast Conference or the Big 12. He died of a heart ailment after collapsing in a conference tournament game at the end of his senior season in 1990, and his teammates honored him with a remarkable run to the Elite Eight.

Seasons: Four (1989-1993)
Final Fours: One (1992)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,613

Legacy: Cheaney, in much the same way Steve Alford had been, was ideal for Bob Knight’s offensive system. Cheaney could catch, pass and, most of all, shoot. The ability to drive the ball from the wing to the goal was not essential in Knight’s motion attack — movement to create distance from defenders was. Cheaney’s size, strength and high release point made him a chore to defend, and his senior season in 1993 was so impressive that he beat out such greats as Penny Hardaway, Bobby Hurley and Chris Webber for player of the year.

Seasons: Three (1990-93)
Final Fours: One (1993)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,843

Legacy: No player did more to lift Kentucky basketball from the ashes of its late-80s NCAA infractions case than Mashburn, who arrived as a slightly underrated recruit and helped the Wildcats advance to the Elite Eight in 1992 — and the glorious regional final game against Duke — and the Final Four a year later. Mashburn’s ball-handling and shooting skill, as well as his strength inside, made him a player two decades ahead of his time: someone who could play as the lone big man while pulling opposing bigs away from the lane.

Seasons: Two (1991-93)
Final Fours: Two (1992, 1993)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,218

Legacy: The impossible combination of length, strength and dynamism contained in Webber made him an almost-unfair asset to the Wolverines during his two college seasons. He blocked shots, passed effectively, rebounded and scored. He even made almost one 3-pointer a game as a sophomore. The Fab Five’s detractors are fond of saying the group “never won anything” because they failed to claim a Big Ten title or NCAA championship. But isn’t the game to reach — the Final Four — worth something? Webber and his mates got two of those. That’s a lot.

Seasons: Four (1996-2000)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,279

Legacy: Martin was an important contributor as a defender and rebounder for three excellent Cincinnati teams from 1997-1999, but when he played for the United States team at the World University Games, he discovered he’d underrated his own talents. He was the best player on the squad, which meant he might be the best in the nation. Turned out, he was. His senior season ranks with the most dominant of any recent player, but it ended prematurely when he fractured his leg in a Conference USA Tournament game.

Seasons: Four (1984-88)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 3,008

Legacy: Playing without a 3-point line for half his career, Hawkins still managed to become one of 10 players ever to hit the 3,000-point mark. His Braves teams excelled in Missouri Valley Conference play, including a 32-3 record in 1985-86 that was rewarded with only a No. 7 seed by the selection committee.

Seasons: Three (1996-99)
Final Fours: (One) 1999
NCAA titles: (One) 1999
Career points: 2,036

Legacy: Predecessor Ray Allen was more glamorous, but Hamilton efficiently elevated UConn to the preeminent Big East power — and the one program capable of challenging Duke’s extraordinary 1998-99 squad. Hamilton wasn’t a high-flying dunker or long-range bomber: He shot right from where the 3-point line was, or inside if necessary. He liked playing where the defense was, because he could get just far enough away to get his shots off — and just near enough to draw fouls. He attempted 505 free throws over three years and converted 83 percent. And he scored 20 or more points in all six 1999 NCAA Tournament games, including 27 in the final.

Seasons: Three (1993-96)
Final Fours: One (1996)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,387

Legacy: Camby was the player who transformed UMass from the Atlantic 10 team challenging all the big boys on the block to a national power as big as any in college hoops. He arrived with a ton of raw ability and gradually refined his game to the point where he was the unanimous player of the year for the 1995-96 season.

Seasons: Four
Final Fours: One (1986)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,556

Legacy: Dawkins was one of the foundational pieces of the four-decade Coach K dynasty. Entering along with David Henderson, Mark Alarie and Jay Bilas, he helped Mike Krzyzewski turn around the Blue Devils and launch them forward with three consecutive NCAA Tournament appearances that culminated with an appearance in the 1986 championship game. Dawkins was a dynamic scoring guard who averaged at least 18.1 points in all four college seasons and earned the Naismith Award as senior.

Seasons: One (2018-19)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 746

Legacy: How much higher would Zion have ranked with three more victories? Would he have been ahead of Carmelo Anthony? Ahead of Anthony Davis? Surely no college freshman ever has been quite the sensation Williamson was. His flying blocks and vicious dunks were must-view affairs. His boundless enthusiasm for his team was alluring as well. Williamson missed five games and still swept the major player of the year awards — he was that far ahead of the class.

Seasons: Three (1992-95)
Final Fours: Two (1994, 1995)
NCAA titles: One (1995)
Career points: 1,728

Legacy: Williamson was one of the last players of his kind: a game-changing low-post scorer, even though he stood barely 6-6. He wasn’t as dynamic as Charles Barkley, but he had better moves inside. And, more importantly, Williamson was the most important piece in Arkansas’ back-to-back Final Four teams and its one NCAA title.

Seasons: Two (2001-03)
Final Fours: One (2003)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,281

Legacy: A 22-point performance in a tight regional semifinal victory over Pitt helped deliver Marquette to the Elite Eight against Kentucky, and there Wade unleashed the full extent of every talent he had flashed the prior two years. Wade’s 29-point, 11-rebound, 11-assist triple-double against the Wildcats ranks with the greatest individual performances of the era. That got Marquette to its first Final Four since 1977.

Seasons: (2002-03)
Final Fours: One (2003)
NCAA titles: One (2003)
Career points: 778

Legacy: Here’s a trivia question we love around here: What’s the only outlet to name Carmelo Anthony first-team All-America for a freshman season in which he averaged 22.2 points and 10 rebounds? Do we need to say the answer? Anthony was such a versatile performer for his size, he could have been an all-conference-level player at every position on the floor. He was the primary force behind Syracuse’s one NCAA championship, averaging just over 20 points and just under 10 rebounds in the Orange’s six victories.

Seasons: Four (1998-2002)
Final Fours: Two (2001, 2002)
NCAA titles: One (2002)
Career points: 2,269

Legacy: There are Maryland players who earned greater honors (such as national player of the year Joe Smith) and left campus with bigger reputations (Len Bias) and who clearly possessed more talent (Steve Francis). But it was Dixon who delivered what Maryland coveted most: a national title. And though he was surrounded by excellent players, it was Dixon who broke free from Dane Fife’s demonic defense in the second half of the 2002 title game against Indiana and finished with 18 points on 6-of-9 shooting. He wound up as the NCAA Tournament Most Outstanding Player. No other Terp can say that.

Seasons: Four (1986-1990)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 3,217

Legacy: Because his La Salle teams played in the Metro Atlantic, they never were taken quite as seriously as they should have been. They got only one first-place AP vote each week while their winning streak grew from 14 to 17 and eventually to 21 games. They never climbed higher than 11th and, with a 29-1 record, got only a No. 4 NCAA seed. But Simmons was viewed as legit, and received the Naismith Award. He averaged 28.4 points as a junior and 26.5 as a senior. At least that didn’t get overlooked.

Seasons: Two (1996-98)
NCAA titles: One (1997)
Career points: 1,061

Legacy: There are a lot of similarities to the college careers of Bibby and Isiah Thomas: two seasons each, one improbable NCAA title, one year as consensus All-American, relatively modest scoring stats but always the ability to burn the opposition in the biggest games. The truth is, Bibby actually won more. His teams were 55-14 to Thomas’ 47-17, and Bibby’s Wildcats reached the Elite Eight in the year they did not win the title.

Seasons: One (2011-12)
Final Fours: One (2012)
NCAA titles: One (2012)
Career points: 567

Legacy: He was around only a year, but few players ever used the college experience so deftly. Already an elite defender when he arrived — with an almost-unprecedented ability to guard the rim but also to disarm opposing pick-and-roll plays — Davis rapidly grew through the course of the season as an offensive player, adding new elements to his game and increasing his confidence. He attempted double-figure shots only four times in 14 games before Jan. 1 of his single college season; he did it 12 times in the final 26 games. He blocked an almost-inhuman 186 shots, including six in the title-game win over Kansas.

Seasons: Three (2008-11)
Final Fours: Two (2009, 2011)
NCAA titles: One (2011)
Career points: 1,783

Legacy: Kemba was not a one-hit wonder. It’s just that one huge smash — the 11-game winning streak that resulted in the 2011 Big East Tournament and NCAA title — was so hard to approach, like asking Harper Lee to top “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Walker was a significant factor on a Final Four team and a load-carrying superstar for the last of Jim Calhoun’s three champions.

Seasons: Four (2002-06)
Final Fours: One (2004)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,769

Legacy: Redick was a tireless performer who averaged better than 37 minutes per game as a junior and senior and scored a career’s worth of points (1,685) in those two years alone. His total of 457 3-pointers made ranks third all-time and he ranks among the top 20 in scoring, as well. He converted at least 95 3s in each of his four college seasons.

Seasons: Three (2015-18)
Final Fours: Two (2016, 2018)
NCAA titles: Two (2016, 2018)
Career points: 1,667

Legacy: Named the Sporting News Player of the Decade for the 2010s, Brunson started for two NCAA champion teams and played the point guard position with a consistency of performance that few others have managed. He excelled at scoring on post-ups against guards unaccustomed to defending along the baseline and converted an astonishing — for a guard — 58.7 percent of his career 2-point attempts.

Seasons: One (2006-07)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 903

Legacy: Durant was the first gift the NBA Draft age limit presented to college basketball, along with Ohio State center Greg Oden. He might otherwise have entered the draft directly out of high school, but playing at Texas allowed him to demonstrate his array of overwhelming offensive talents. He was lethal from close to the goal, 3-point range and the foul line, where he attempted 256 free throws and converted 81.6 percent.

Seasons: Four (1997-2001)
Final Fours: Two (1999, 2001)
NCAA titles: One (2001)
Career points: 1,984

Legacy: Battier was one of the great winners of the modern era, earning consensus player of the year honors as a senior in 2001, playing in two NCAA championship games and finishing with a record of 131-15, which included a 16-3 mark in NCAA Tournament games.

Seasons: Four (2010-14)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 3,150

Legacy: McDermott was supposed to enroll at Northern Iowa, until his father became head coach at Creighton; UNI generously allowed him out of his commitment, and McDermott became one of the great scorers in college basketball history. His 3-point accuracy of 45.8 percent would rank seventh all-time in Division I if his 274 career 3s weren’t 15 short of the qualifying standard.

Seasons: Four (1996-2000)
Final Fours: Two (1999, 2000)
NCAA titles: One (2000)
Career points: 1,541

Legacy: It’s hard to describe how commanding Cleaves’ presence was as a point guard, or to compare him to a player who’s performed in college or the NBA since. When the ball was in his hands, he owned the game. He averaged 6.6 assists and 1.6 steals for his career. He was a scorer when he needed to be, a creator more than that, but above all a leader and a winner. Coach Tom Izzo will tell you he was the most important recruit during his time as head coach.

Seasons: Four (1981-85)
Final Fours: One (1985)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,408

Legacy: His lack of professional success has caused Lee’s star to fade over time — except in Memphis, where he is revered as an all-time great. As a collegian, Lee stood toe-to-toe with Patrick Ewing and Hakeem Olajuwon — in the space of five days — and scored a combined 41 points and grabbed 23 rebounds on 54 percent shooting.

Seasons: Four (1983-87)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,669

Legacy: Robinson blossomed from 6-7 wing to dynamic 7-1 center during his first two years at Navy, but instead of ducking out and transferring to a basketball power after two years — and avoiding his service commitment and getting to NBA riches earlier — he completed his education at the academy and took the Midshipmen to three straight NCAA Tournaments. That included an astonishing Elite Eight run in 1986.

Seasons: Four (1985-89)
Final Fours: One (1988)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,555

Legacy: Elliott was the first great player of Lute Olson’s Arizona revival, and was the foundation of their great Final Four team in 1988. The 3-point line arrived in his sophomore season and he made nearly 43 percent of his career attempts. He was a national player of the year as a senior.

Seasons: Three (1995-98)
Final Fours: Two (1997, 1998)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,974

Legacy: Jamison was not the prize recruit in his Carolina class, though he was the better college player between himself and Vince Carter. Together, they took the Tar Heels to consecutive Final Fours. Jamison became the consensus player of the year as a junior, using his ability to elevate and score over defenders in the post to average 22.2 points.

Seasons: Four (1982-86)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,146

Legacy: Bias built his game over the course of his four seasons with the Terps, and by the time he was a senior was one of the best players in the nation. But Maryland was part of a stacked ACC that season; the Terps finished under .500 in a brutal ACC season but still got a No. 5 seed, and Bias continued his rampage with 31 points in a first-round victory — and 26 in defeat.

Seasons: Three (1989-1992)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,941

Legacy: There is a statue of O’Neal outside the Maravich Assembly Center that demonstrates how important he was. (He is, of course, depicted throwing down a two-handed slam). For reasons that remain hard to explain, he never played on a team that was seeded better than No. 5 in the NCAAs, nor advanced to the Sweet 16, but his career averages of 21.6 points, 13.5 rebounds and 4.6 blocks are evidence of his excellence.

Seasons: Two (1992-94)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 1,706

Legacy: The man they called “Big Dog” produced what could be considered the best single season of the era, a 30.3-point tour de force that left analysts searching for answers to “the best since when” questions and carried the Boilermakers to the Elite Eight in 1994.

Seasons: Three (1982-85)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,661

Legacy: His astonishing freshman-year performance (24.5 points per game) and his enduring popularity as a performer led the United States Basketball Writers Association to name its freshman of the year award after Tisdale.

Seasons: Four (1993-97)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,117

Legacy: Duncan’s late introduction to the game meant arriving in college with much to learn, but he still averaged 9.6 points and 9.8 rebounds as a freshman — and he still wound up with career averages of 16.5 points and 12.3 rebounds. What kept him from reaching the Final Four? It might have been as simple as the poor luck to be grouped in his junior season in a region with 1996 Kentucky, the best team of this era. The Deacons lost to those Wildcats in the Elite Eight.

Seasons: Three (1999-2002)
Final Fours: One (2001)
NCAA titles: One (2001)
Career points: 2,079

Legacy: When Williams was a junior, with a championship ring already earned, Sporting News wanted to do a story about how a team prepared to defend him. We almost never got declined for those kinds of stories, but four schools rejected our request before Wake Forest and the late, great Skip Prosser agreed. That’s how much Williams frightened opponents. He was an elite shooting guard (19.3 ppg. career) and elite point guard (6.0 apg.) in the same person.

Seasons: Four (2000-04)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,094

Legacy: Nelson was a consummate point guard who invigorated a Saint Joseph’s program that had gone 13-16 the year before he arrived. With Jameer at the controls, the Hawks won three Atlantic 10 regular-season titles, averaged 25 wins, compiled a perfect 27-0 regular season record in 2003-04 and reached the Elite Eight that season, losing on a late jumpshot by Oklahoma State’s John Lucas III.

Seasons: Four (1983-87)
Final Fours: (One) 1987
NCAA titles: (One) 1987
Career points: 2,438

Legacy: Alford got the opportunity to play with the 3-point line for a single season. And this is how good he was in that department: He shot 53 percent from long range, and that was on six attempts per game. Alford’s sophomore- and junior-year teams did not delivery IU’s customary success (an NIT and a massive NCAA first-round upset loss against Cleveland State), but in his senior year they won the Big Ten championship, earned a No. 1 seed, outlasted UNLV in a beautiful semifinal and then escaped Syracuse in a classic title game. Alford hit seven 3-pointers in the championship.

Seasons: Three (2006-09)
Final Fours: None
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,635

Legacy: Had Curry chosen to play his senior year at Davidson and produced a season like either his sophomore or junior years, he might have been in position to replace Pete Maravich as the NCAA’s career scoring leader. Of course, the Pistol put up his numbers in three years — but even at that, no one has really come close. Curry’s career tournament scoring average of 31.6 would rank fourth all-time if he’d qualified for the list by playing one more game. That one, though, was on the NCAA selection committee that left out the Wildcats after they went 27-8 and 18-2 in the Southern Conference in 2008-09.

Seasons: Four (1989-1993)
Final Fours: Three (1990, 1991, 1992)
NCAA titles: Two (1991, 1992)
Career points: 1,731

Legacy: It’s easy to lose track of Hurley’s greatness since he played with players who achieved more professionally, but all one needs to do to understand how much he mattered is to watch games like the 1992 Elite Eight win over Kentucky, or the 1991 Final Four win over UNLV. Hurley is the NCAA’s career assists leader; he never averaged fewer than 7.4 per game over his four seasons. Even coach Mike Krzyzewski called Hurley’s late 3-pointer in the UNLV game the biggest shot in Duke basketball history – which means it was bigger than Laettner’s basket the following year to advance the Devils to their fifth consecutive Final Four.

Seasons: Four (1981-85)
Final Fours: One (1985)
NCAA titles: None
Career points: 2,440

Legacy: Mullin was the most complete offensive player of the era. He was a brilliant ball-handler, an elite jump-shooter and, most of all, an extraordinary passer. He could have averaged 25 points a game given his skill, but he never attempted even 15 shots per game for a season, instead producing averages of four assists or better as a junior and senior. The Red Storm lost narrow NCAA Tournament heartbreakers in each of his first three seasons — by a combined six points — before Mullin went for 25 points against N.C. State in the victory that at last put them in the Final Four.

Seasons: Two (1989-1991)
Final Fours: Two (1990, 1991)
NCAA titles: One (1991)
Career points: 1,617

Legacy: Johnson was a matchup nightmare for college opponents, few of whom could cope with his combination of strength, dynamism and skill. Johnson and his gifted teammates found their rhythm midway through the 1989-90 season and won 15 of their final 16 games before the tournament, then won six in a row — including a championship-game record 30-point blowout against Duke. Only two teams since 1976 have carried perfect records into the Final Four, and Johnson’s Rebels were the first of those, riding his 22.7 points and 10.9 rebounds to 34 consecutive wins.

Seasons: Four (2005-09)
Final Fours: 2008, 2009
NCAA titles: 2009
Career points: 2,872

Legacy: Hansbrough was a four-time Sporting News first-team All-American, the first to earn that designation from one of the four contributors to the NCAA’s official consensus squad. He was the consensus national player of the year as a junior, then as senior was the focal point of a Tar Heels squad that overwhelmed its NCAA Tournament opposition by an average of 20 points. He averaged 17.5 points in that tournament run.

Seasons: Four (1981-85)
Final Fours: Three (1982, 1984, 1985)
NCAA titles: One (19840
Career points: 2,184

Legacy: Ewing was one of the greatest winning forces in the history of college basketball. He was such an overwhelming defender he dominated the 1982 NCAA Tournament even though he twice scored in single digits. He finished with a career record of 16-3 in tournament games and appeared in three finals.

Seasons: Four (1984-88)
Final Fours: Two (1986, 1988)
NCAA titles: One (1988)
Career points: 2,951

Legacy: Manning’s performance in the 1988 tournament, particularly the national championship victory over Oklahoma, ranks with the greatest ever. He averaged 27.2 points and 9.3 rebounds during the tournament. It was his willingness to take as many shots as necessary to elevate the team known as “Danny and the Miracles” to the championship that made the difference for Kansas following a somewhat indifferent regular season. Manning also was a major contributor as a manager on the 2006 Kansas team that lost in the national semifinal.

Seasons: Four (1988-92)
Final Fours: Four (1989, 1990, 1991, 1992)
NCAA titles: Two (1991, 1992)
Career points: 2,460

Legacy: Laettner played in more Final Four games than many great players have NCAA Tournament games. He is one of only a few players to appear in four Final Fours, and played in 23 of a possible 24 NCAA Tournament games — a record that will be extremely difficult to break. He twice hit game-winning, buzzer-beating shots to get Duke to the Final Four, made the game-clinching free throws in Duke’s 1991 upset of undefeated UNLV, was named most outstanding player at the 1991 Final Four and was the consensus college player of the year in 1992.

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